Easy to read Mukund Mala Stotram: with Sandhi-vichched (Hindi Edition) por King Kulashekhar Alwar

October 16, 2019

Easy to read Mukund Mala Stotram: with Sandhi-vichched (Hindi Edition) por King Kulashekhar Alwar

Titulo del libro: Easy to read Mukund Mala Stotram: with Sandhi-vichched (Hindi Edition)

Autor: King Kulashekhar Alwar

Número de páginas: 12 páginas

Fecha de lanzamiento: October 23, 2018

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King Kulashekhar Alwar con Easy to read Mukund Mala Stotram: with Sandhi-vichched (Hindi Edition)

Mukundamala is a poem in Sanskrit written by Kulashekhara Alvar, one of the last kings of the Chera dynasty in Kerala, and the 9th Alvar (one of 12 mendicant saints venerated by south Indian Srivaishnavism) around 1100CE. It is written in the style of Bhakti saints and asks Mukunda, another name for Vishnu or Krishna, to give the unworthy author freedom from Samsara. It describes the misery of the soul trapped in this world and exhorts that Krishna is the only means of salvation.

King Kulaśekhara was part of the Śrī-sampradāya, the Vaiṣṇava school founded by Lord Viṣṇu's divine consort, Śrī. This school's most prominent representative, Rāmānuja Ācārya (eleventh century), built on the work of his predecessors Nātha Muni and Yāmuna Ācārya and established the systematic philosophy of Śrī Vaiṣṇavism. But these ācāryas came in an already old tradition, that of the ecstatic mystic poets called Ālvārs. The twelve Ālvārs appeared at various times in South India, in the area roughly corresponding to present-day Tamil Nadu. According to the tradition of the Śrī Vaiṣṇavas, the earliest Ālvārs lived more than five thousand years ago, at the start of the present age, Kali-yuga, while the most recent lived in the first millennium A.D.

A traditional history of King Kulaśekhara states that once, as he slept in his palace quarters, he had a brilliant and distinct vision of Lord Kṛṣṇa. Upon awaking he fell into a devotional trance and failed to notice dawn breaking. The royal musicians and ministers came as usual to his door to wake him, but after waiting some time without hearing him respond, they reluctantly took the liberty of entering his room. The king came out of his trance and described his vision to them, and from that day on he no longer took much interest in ruling. He delegated most of his responsibilities to his ministers and dedicated himself to rendering devotional service to the Lord. After some years he abdicated the throne and went to Śrī Raṅgam, where he remained in the association of the Kṛṣṇa Deity of Raṅganātha and His many exalted devotees. At Śrī Raṅgam Kulaśekhara is said to have composed his two great works: the Mukunda-mālā-stotra, in Sanskrit; and 105 Tamil hymns, which were later incorporated into the Tiruvāymoli under the title Perumāl-tirumoli.